Rebuilding A Camaro In 48 Hours? Ridetech says, “You Betcha”

RidetechMany times, manufacturer’s will build a car to showcase the fitment of its products, and then verify how those products work. Ridetech is no different, and they’re taking it one step farther. We’re sure that many of you probably know about the companies 48 our builds, and once again, the guys will be building a badass hot rod in 48 hours

This is the fourth 48 Hour project the company has started, and once again, it is taking place in January at the 2018 Barrett-Jackson Auction, Scottsdale, Arizona. Under a tent, RideTech and a team of manufacturers will turn a 1971 Camaro into a Pro Touring masterpiece using the latest and greatest go-fast parts.


You might remember that last year’s 48 Hour build was a ’68 GMC short bed pickup, and the build unfolded in front of 300,000-plus event attendees at the 2017 Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Auction. A constant crowd of enthusiasts looked on as the six-day (8 hours per day) thrash ensued. One onlooker, liked the truck so much that he purchased it on the auction block.

Although the interior is in decent shape, it is getting made over with custom upholstery upgrades from Recovery Room Hot Rod Interiors, Vintage Air, and gauges from Classic Instruments.

This year, the excitement will continue long after the build and the Barrett-Jackson auction event have concluded. The new 48 Hour Camaro is a keeper. It’s not for sale (not yet anyway). The plans are to show it and race it alongside its upstart sibling — the new Track 1 Camaro. Like Jekyl and Hyde, the two second-gen cars have starkly contrasting personalities. The orange 48 Hour Camaro represents a street-friendly, yet highly capable Pro Touring car, while the caged and carbon fiber-equipped Track 1 Camaro represents a street-legal race car. More details on the Track 1 build can be found here, but for now, let’s focus on the new 48 Hour Camaro project.

At this time, Ridetech is still discussing part numbers and possibilities with last minute build partners, but most of the key components and systems are set in stone. Currently, the 48 Hour Camaro benefits from a 300hp crate small-block. But, that is being replaced with a Lingenfelter Performance Engineering 550hp LS3. The street friendly combination features ported and polished cylinder heads, a hydraulic-roller cam, Holley EFI, MSD ignition, and Hooker exhaust.

Behind that will be a Bowler 4L65E electronic overdrive transmission with Sonnax Level 3 upgrades and a Pro Torque billet, lock-up torque converter. The brakes will be Baer 13-inch four-wheel disc brakes. Rollers are by Forgeline, and are ML3C 18-inch diameter wheels wrapped in a set of B.F. Goodrich Rivals. Ridetech plans to drive this car aggressively and competitively, so the heavy-duty brakes, wheels, tires, and suspension are mandatory.


The gen-one small-block will be replaced with a new, Lingenfelter-built LS monster.

Speaking of suspension, the finished car will host RideTech’s StrongArm control arms and Tru Turn steering up front with its new “unicradle” design Bolt-On four-Link kit with a Currie Enterprises Crate 9-inch rear, and trick MillerBuilt floater axle conversion. RideTech TQ Series triple adjustable coilovers will be used all around.

The car will be driven, so some modicum of interior comfort is required. Vintage Air will add comfort and reliability, while Kicker is providing the tunes. Tracy Weaver at Recovery Room is already hard at work upholstering the interior panels, and Classic Instruments gauges are going in.


A solid foundation.

There is no arguing that these 48 Hour builds are grueling, but there is something special about transforming a cool car in front of 300,000-plus onlookers. Enthusiasts monitor progress, ask questions and study the parts that are awaiting installation.

The guys at Ridetech are eager to drive it across the country when it’s completed, race it, and show it off alongside the Track 1 Camaro in 2018. You can follow build by clicking here. Buckle up, this is going to be a wild ride.

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About the author

Randy Bolig

Randy Bolig has been working on cars, and involved in the hobby ever since he bought his first car when he was only 14 years old. His passion got him noticed by many locals, and he began to help them with their own vehicles.
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